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Nano-paper filter can remove viruses

Researchers at the Division of Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Uppsala University have developed a paper filter, which can remove virus particles with an efficiency matching that of the best industrial virus filters. The paper filter consists of 100 percent high purity cellulose nanofib... Read More

Tamiflu-resistant influenza: parsing the genome for the culprits

It doesn’t take long for the flu virus to outsmart Tamiflu. EPFL scientists have developed a tool that reveals the mutations that make the virus resistant, and they have identified new mutations that may render ineffective one of the few treatments currently available on the market.

Tamiflu ... Read More

Proteins discovered in gonorrhea may offer new approach to treatment

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered novel proteins in, or on the surface of the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, which offer a promising new avenue of attack against a venereal disease that is showing increased resistance to the antibiotics used to treat it.

Only a single, t... Read More

Ancient whodunit may be solved: The microbes did it!

Methane-producing microbes may be responsible for the largest mass extinction in Earth’s history.

Evidence left at the crime scene is abundant and global: Fossil remains show that sometime around 252 million years ago, about 90 percent of all species on Earth were suddenly wiped out — by far ... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 160 - Residents Regulate RNA Response

This episode: Gut microbe communities can help regulate the immune response to pathogens!


(9.5 MB, 10.3 minutes)


Show notes: 
News item/ Read More

Fungus May Block Alzheimer's Protein

Some natural types of fungus appear to inhibit the build-up of tau—a protein linked to Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

“Tau is a protein that is produced by the body,” says T. Chris Gamblin, associate professor of molecular biosciences at the University of Kansas. “I... Read More

An immune system for Algernon?

I haven't read it (yet) but heard Daniel Keyes' 1960 short story/1966 novel is a sci-fi masterpiece.

And it's the first place my mind went upon reading about this fascinating breakthrough by researchers at Yale. Read More

Ancient buried treasure found in daisy seeds

By tracing the evolutionary origin of a drug-like protein ring found in sunflowers, Australian and US scientists have discovered a diverse, 18-million-year-old group of buried proteins in daisy seeds.

Researchers at The University of Western Australia, working with academics from The Universi... Read More

Baker's Yeast Gets a Genetic Makeover

The humble baker's yeast has been enlisted to serve the needs of humanity, responsible for beer, wine and bread, among other staples. A domesticated servant for at least millennia, the microscopic fungus has now had one of its chromosomes swapped out by a host of undergraduate students in favor ... Read More

Are tiny microbes outwitting us to steal our food?

It's long been know that microbes are to blame for food going off and becoming rotten but in the late 1970's, Dan Janzen of the University of Pennsylvania, and a winner of ecology's version of the Nobel Prize, suggested that making something rotten may be to the advantage of the microbes living ... Read More

Ancient Virus DNA Gives Stem Cells the Power to Transform

A virus that invaded the genomes of humanity's ancestors millions of years ago now plays a critical role in the embryonic stem cells from which all cells in the human body derive, new research shows.

The discovery sheds light on the role viruses play in human evolution and could help scientis... Read More

From Geology to Biology: A Serpentine Story of Early Life

Over 4.5 billion years ago, the Earth was a superheated sphere of molten rock, radiating heat to space at over 2000 K. A billion years later, it had global oceans, teeming with microorganisms. In that time, the Earth underwent massive geological changes, somehow serendipitously creating conditio... Read More

Reprogrammed Bacteria Build Self-Healing ‘Living Materials’

How handy would it be if, instead of taking your broken circuit board to the Genius Bar (again), you could just prompt it to heal itself? That’s the futuristic possibility researchers have recently inched ever so slightly toward, with the development of hybrid “living materials” made from bacter... Read More

Bacillus subtilis

Streak plate isolation showing colonial morphology of Bacillus subtilis on trypticase soy agar (TSA) incubated for 24 hours at 37oC. Note the rough and dry/matte texture characteristic of this organism’s growth. Read More

Unknown Floor isolate #2

Partial isolate of an unknown organism on trypticase soy agar exhibiting spreading and mounding in an irregular-rhizoid form with lobate margins. The colony exhibited an opaque yellow-orange pigment with a mucoid surface. This sample was obtained from a floor swab and incubated at 37°C. Read More

Unknown floor isolate

Partial isolate of an unknown organism on trypticase soy agar exhibiting spreading and an irregular-rhizoid form with lobate margins. The pigment is opaque white-beige with a mucoid surface over most of the colony. A dry, dull, matte surface appears toward the outer edges of the colony. The s... Read More

Fighting Cholera With Mass Vaccination

When studying bacteria it is quite easy to get fascinated with them as a laboratory specimen while forgetting the huge impact they can have in real life societies. I find the PLoS journal of Neglected Tropical diseases redresses that as it covers work with bacteria and parasites from the front l... Read More

Physarum oblatum

Myxomycetes are well-known as true slime molds whose plasmodia are increadibly beautiful. Plasmodial culture is a such kind of hard-working steps in working with the species of Kingdom Protista. Interestingly, they can unpredictably "move" around water agar dishes. Furthermore, they are in progr... Read More

TWiV 278: Flushing HIV down the zinc



Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Read More

Concrete-Dissolving Bacteria Are Destroying Our Nation's Sewers

Underground in places nobody likes to look, bacteria are doing terrible things to our sewage pipes. The concrete pipes that carry our waste are literally dissolving away, forcing engineers into a messy, expensive battle against tiny microbes.

"The veins of our cities are in serious trouble, a... Read More

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