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Is Scientific American Following You?

Scientific American is on twitter (@sciam) and wrote up a quick list of science people they follow on twitter including Carl Zimmer aka @carlzimmer, evolutionary biologist Jonathan Eisen aka Read More

Microbe Evolution Gets a Push

Improved DNA sequencing technology is making reading genomes faster and cheaper every day. But modifying genes in microbes and other organisms still requires slow and painstaking effort. Now, researchers report that they've come up with a new way to modify the genomes of billions of microbes sim... Read More

Can Good Bacteria Really Fight the Flu?

Cold and flu sufferers, there may be a way to head off those irritating symptoms before they cause you to miss work or school.

New evidence suggests that probiotics -- good bacteria that can aid immune function -- can have a preventive effect for cold and flu viruses.

In a study sponsored... Read More

Natural Born Killers: How The Body's Frontline Immune Cells Decide Which Cells To Destroy

The mechanism used by 'Natural Killer' immune cells in the human body to distinguish between diseased cells, which they are meant to destroy, and normal cells, which they are meant to leave alone, is revealed in new detail in research published July 28 in PLoS Biology.

Understanding how this ... Read More

Swine flu threat greater than terrorism, says UK's Home Secretary

Swine flu is now a greater threat to Britain than terrorism, according to Alan Johnson, the Home Secretary. The government is now advising pregnant women to avoid unnecessary travel.

To date, more than 650 people have been taken to hospital with the virus in England, including more than 200... Read More

The Ocean's Skin

Carl Zimmer of the NY Times has written an interesting article on researchers who have confirmed that there is a very thin film of microbes covering the ocean surface. They claim that the top hundredth-inch of the ocean is an ecosystem all unto its own.

Michael Cunliffe, a marine biologist a... Read More

Study: Predicting Hospital Surge after a Large-Scale Anthrax Attack

According to a study in a special issue of Medical Decision Making, a large-scale, covert anthrax attack on a large city would overwhelm hospital resources even with an extremely effective public health response, primarily because of expected delays in detecting the attack and initiating a respo... Read More

Filamentous yeast from spoiled beverage

Filamentous yeast from spoiled beverage. Filaments and budding. Phase. (1008X) Read More

Scientists consider biobutanol a more efficient alternative to corn-based ethanol

"A group of researchers at Tulane University is working to develop biological methods for producing butanol that might ultimately lead to widespread use of the chemical as a fuel generated from waste materials rather than nonrenewable fossil fuels.

Once the researchers determine the best bact... Read More

The International Probiotics Association Moves to Zurich, Switzerland

According to Nutra-ingredients.com, the International Probiotics Association (IPA) is relocating its headquarters to to Zurich, Switzerland, a move that is designed to bring the organization closer to regulatory action related to the healthy bacteria. This relocation comes just a few months ... Read More

Wealthy Countries Stock Up On H1N1 Vaccine

According to AFP, countries are scrambling to buy up hundreds of millions of doses of the H1N1 vaccine. However, health experts from WHO are warning that developing nations may not get adequate supplies if wealthy nations grab up the all the vaccine it can. Click "source" for the full story. Read More

First real-time video of bacteria infecting a living host

Scientists at the University of Bath and University of Exeter have developed a new technique that allows them to make a movie of bacteria infecting their living host. And, according to the researchers, the first film to follow the progress of infection in real-time with living organisms.

Usin... Read More

H1N1 flu spreads to remote corners of the world: WHO

There may be no escape from H1N1 pandemic flu, which according to the latest World Health Organization figures has spread to the most remote parts of the planet including popular island getaways.

In a snapshot published on Monday, the WHO said more than 20 countries and overseas territories h... Read More

New accreditation process for laboratories across Africa pushed by leading health authorities

Government health officials from 13 African countries today launched the first-ever push for accreditation of the continent's medical laboratories, starting a process that the World Health Organization (WHO) and the U.S. Government believe will be an historic step to strengthen health systems an... Read More

HIV Uses Autophagy For Its Own Means

Not satisfied with simply thwarting its host's defensive maneuvers, HIV actually twists one to its advantage, based on new findings from Kyei et al. in the July 27, 2009 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology. Vojo Deretic and colleagues suggest that autophagy—a stress response process—helps HIV t... Read More

HGS's Lupus Drug Shows Promise in Latest Trials

An experimental drug that aims to treat people afflicted with the autoimmune disease lupus showed promising results in its latest round of tests, giving its Rockville-based developer hope that it may have a financial success on its hands.

Human Genome Sciences is set to report the new results... Read More

The Lab Coat Is on the Hook in the Fight Against Germs

Picture a doctor in your mind’s eye, and what do you see? A stethoscope, maybe. Perhaps a little black bag. And almost certainly a white lab coat.

But that last item may be destined for oblivion.

The American Medical Association is studying a proposal made at its annual meeting in June th... Read More

GAO Says Tornado Alley Is Not the Best Place for DHS Infectious Disease Research Facility

The Washington Post is reporting "the Department of Homeland Security relied on a rushed, flawed study to justify its decision to locate a $700 million research facility for highly infectious pathogens in a tornado-prone section of Kansas, according to a government report."

"The department's... Read More

The Mean Gene Evolution Machine

Researchers at Harvard Medical School have created a new genome engineering machine officially called MAGE (multiplex automated genome engineering) that can tweak dozens of genes to create billions of unique microbial strains in a few days.

"MAGE relies on the tendency of cells to incorporate... Read More

UT Houston research identifies microbe that could trigger colic in babies

Published in the online edition of the Journal of Pediatrics, a study authored by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston suspect an organism called Klebsiella, a normally occurring bacterium that can be found in the mouth, skin and intestines as the cause for bab... Read More

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