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'Evolutionary forecasting' for drug resistance

Rice University biochemists are developing a system of "evolutionary forecasting" to better understand the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

"Our goal is to show antibiotic makers which sets of genes a pathogen will modify to become drug-resistant," said Yousif Shamoo, the principal invest... Read More

New chemically-activated antigen could expedite development of HIV vaccine

Scientists working to develop a vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) report they have created the first antigen that induces protective antibodies capable of blocking infection of human cells by genetically-diverse strains of HIV. The new antigen differs from previously-tested vacc... Read More

New Drugs May Attack Flu, but Not in Time

Besides the vaccines aimed at preventing flu, new drugs are on the way to treat it once it strikes. But it is not clear whether they will arrive in time to make a difference in thwarting the H1N1 flu pandemic.

New drugs are needed, researchers say, because there are now only four approved flu... Read More

Small Things Considered: Good Guys, Bad Guys

excerpted from Moselio Schaechter's blog (http://schaechter.asmblog.org)...

Because it prefers to dine on some of our valued crop plants, the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) is considered a major pest—thus a Bad Guy from our perspective. Pea aphids are not without their enemies. Enemy number... Read More

DARPA awards Duke $19.5 million to detect viral infection before symptoms appear

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the research arm of the U.S. Department of Defense, has awarded Duke University $19.5 million for an effort led by the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy (IGSP) to design a portable, easy-to-use diagnostic device that can reveal who... Read More

Magnetic switch for drug delivery implants

Researchers have developed an "on/off" switch for implantable drug delivery systems that uses an external magnet to trigger the internal release of the medicine. The half-inch implant stores the drug inside a nanoengineered membrane containing magnetitie. An external magnetic field causes the me... Read More

Where Will Synthetic Biology Lead Us?

In “A Life of Its Own," Michael Specter explores the opportunities and challenges posed by the emerging field of synthetic biology. “No scientific achievement has promised so much, and none has come with greater risks or clearer possibilities for deliberate abuse,” Specter writes. Synthetic biolo... Read More

Killer fungus breaks chemical stalemate

A killer fungus may break the chemical stalemate that is hampering anti-malaria efforts.

Mosquitoes that carry malaria are becoming increasingly resistant to insecticides. In theory, spraying two different types of insecticide at once postpones resistance, as bugs that resist one type are kil... Read More

What to do with dirty diapers?

If you are studying the gut flora of infants you would save them to run samples on a microarray, which I doubt is what our colleague will be doing with his daughter's after her debut later this afternoon. The article linked above discusses a study (http://www.plosbiology.org/article/info:doi/10... Read More

Anatomy of a Pandemic

CBCNews.ca has a really great interactive time line that "illustrates some key dates in the evolution of the first pandemic of the 21st century."

Click "source" to view. Read More

Pets can get MRSA from their owners

MRSA, the microbe also known as the flesh eating bacterium, not only infects humans, but can also be transmitted from people to animals and then back again.

"In a study this summer in The American Journal of Infection Control, Elizabeth A. Scott and her colleagues at the Center for Hygiene a... Read More

Researchers find first evidence of virus in malignant prostate cells

In a finding with potentially major implications for identifying a viral cause of prostate cancer, researchers at the University of Utah and Columbia University medical schools have reported that a type of virus known to cause leukemia and sarcomas in animals has been found for the first time in... Read More

Piece from childhood virus may save soldiers' lives

A harmless shard from the shell of a common childhood virus may halt a biological process that kills a significant percentage of battlefield casualties, heart attack victims and oxygen-deprived newborns, according to research presented Sunday, September 6, 2009, at the 12th European meeting on c... Read More

Argonne, UChicago scientists chase deadly MRSA bacteria with new models

Ten years ago, Chicago hospitals were at ground zero when the deadly MRSA bacterium, till then confined to hospitals, learned some new tricks and spilled out into the community. This year, researchers from DOE's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago are teaming up to develop... Read More

UCF Professor Finds New Way Deadly Food-Borne Bacteria Spread

University of Central Florida Microbiology Professor Keith Ireton has uncovered a previously unknown mechanism that plays an important role in the spread of a deadly food-borne bacterium.

Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterium that can cause pregnant women to lose their fetuses and trigger fat... Read More

SEM showing bacteria in close association with human intestinal brush border cells (12000X)

SEM showing bacteria in close association with human intestinal brush border cells (12000X) Read More

Govt: 1 swine flu shot enough for older kids

Studies of the new swine flu vaccine show children 10 and older will need just one shot for protection against swine flu — but younger kids almost certainly will need two.

Protection kicks in for older children within eight to 10 days, just like it does for adults, the National Institutes of ... Read More

J. Craig Venter, Ph.D. to Receive National Medal of Science From President Obama

J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., founder, president and chairman of the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), has been named a recipient of this year's National Medal of Science. Dr. Venter will be awarded the Medal from President Obama on October 7 at a White House ceremony.

The National Medal of Science... Read More

Vaccine for Swine Flu Is Ahead of Expectations

More than three million doses of swine flu vaccine will be available by the first week of October, a little earlier than had been anticipated, federal health officials announced Friday.

But nearly all those 3.4 million doses will be of the FluMist nasal spray type, which is not recommended fo... Read More

Are you bathing in bacteria?

Can taking a shower be hazardous to your health? Perhaps so, according to a study published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

We’re not talking about anything as mundane as slipping and falling in a wet, soapy shower stall. Nope, this is much creepier. We’re... Read More

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