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Don’t Smother Labs, Panel Says

A panel of university and private-sector scientists urged Congress not to overregulate laboratories that handle deadly pathogens, saying it could have a chilling effect on research. In a 161-page report, a committee of the National Research Council says the best protection against deliberate mis... Read More

Chicago family seeks answers in Malcolm Casadaban's death by plague

ABC News video on the late Malcom Casadaban, a University of Chicago researcher who passed away after exposure to Yersinia pestis.

"The tragic irony is that Professor Casadaban had been trying to develop a vaccine so that thousands of people around the world wouldn't die a painful, ugly death... Read More

Naval scientist Patricia Guerry is the Partnership for Public Service 2009 Science and Technology Medal Recipient for her work on Campylobacter

If you’ve ever suffered through a bad case of food poisoning, you’ll be glad to know that Naval scientist Patricia Guerry has made a breakthrough that may dramatically reduce the odds that you’ll have to relive this miserable experience. Read More

Spirillum serpens

Electron shadowed micrograph of terminal portion of Spirillum serpens Read More

Understanding A Cell's Split Personality Aids Synthetic Circuits

As scientists work toward making genetically altered bacteria create living "circuits" to produce a myriad of useful proteins and chemicals, they have logically assumed that the single-celled organisms would always respond to an external command in the same way.

Alas, some bacteria apparently... Read More

Fish-Killing Toxin Could Kill Cancer Cells

A powerful fish-killing toxin could have cancer-killing properties as well, according to collaborative research led by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) microbiologist Paul V. Zimba and chemist Peter Moeller of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The toxin, called ... Read More

E. Coli Path Shows Flaws in Beef Inspection

Stephanie Smith, a children’s dance instructor, thought she had a stomach virus. The aches and cramping were tolerable that first day, and she finished her classes.

Then her diarrhea turned bloody. Her kidneys shut down. Seizures knocked her unconscious. The convulsions grew so relentless tha... Read More

Humans as Host

The exact number of bacteria living in or on humans isn't known, though it is estimated to be around a trillion. In any case, the number of microbial cells in the human body outnumbers the human ones by a factor of 10. Those symbiotic microbes endow humans with otherwise unattainable metabolic c... Read More

BHU scientists isolate coal-degrading bacteria

In a major scientific breakthrough, scientists of the School of Biotechnology, Banaras Hindu University, have isolated a group of
bacteria that degrades lignite coal (low energy producing coal) to produce methane gas for increased fuel efficiency.

While the isolation of the special group of... Read More

3 Americans share 2009 Nobel medicine prize

Americans Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Carol W. Greider and Jack W. Szostak won the 2009 Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for discovering a key mechanism in the genetic operations of cells, an insight that has inspired new lines of research into cancer.

It was the first time two women have been a... Read More

Nanotechnology sensor detects living bacteria at ultralow concentrations

A pathogen is a an organism (bacterium, virus, parasite) that causes disease in another organism. According to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), known pathogens account for an estimated 14 million illnesses, 60,000 hospitalizations, and 1,800 deaths each year i... Read More

A Better Way To Watch Bacteria Swim

Researchers have developed a new method for studying bacterial swimming, one that allows them to trap Escherichia coli bacteria and modify the microbes' environment without hindering the way they move.

The new approach, described this month in Nature Methods, uses optical traps, microfluidic ... Read More

TWiV 52: Scott Hammer, MD on AIDS vaccines



HostsVincent Racaniello and Scott Hammer, MD


Vincent and Dr. Scott Hammer talk about different types of AIDS vac... Read More

USDA Food Saftey Video for Pregnant Women

A very important message to women who are pregnant. Listeria monocytogenes is very dangerous for anyone who is immunocompromised and it is one of few bacterial pathogens that can cross the fetal-placenta barrier and infect the fetus, usually resulting in fetal death. The USDA produced this vid... Read More

Vaccination guide for expats

Planning a move abroad? Dr Sneh Khemka, Medical Director for Bupa International, gives us a brief guide to some of the most commonly required travel vaccinations and medicines for destinations around the world.

If you’re moving outside Western Europe, the United States or Australasia, you sh... Read More

Md. cheese goes raw (Video)

A pilot program is allowing some Maryland creameries to manufacture and sell raw milk cheese. This video takes you to Chapel County Creamery to see the unpasteurized process first hand. Read More

'Natural Killer' Cells Keep Immune System In Balance

Researchers from Brown University and McGill University have discovered that the natural killer, or NK cells, help prevent T cells from over-responding when a virus hits. This balance helps prevent T cells, which ordinarily serve the immune system, from causing harm.

Natural killer, or NK cel... Read More

Laser Technique Has Implications For Detecting Microbial Life Forms In Martian Ice

"Michael Storrie-Lombardi, PhD, from Kinohi Institute (Pasadena, CA), and Birgit Sattler, PhD, from the University of Innsbruck, Austria, used laser-induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.) imaging to detect red and infrared fluorescence activity produced by cyanobacteria present in the ice of f... Read More

New Ancient Fungus Finding Suggests World's Forests Were Wiped Out In Global Catastrophe

Before there were dinosaurs and the continents still formed what is known as Pangaea, there was Reduviasporonites. This wood eating fungus dominated our planet's land mass following a global catastrophe that saw Basalt lava flows which exterminated up to 96 per cent of all marine species and 70 ... Read More

Panda poop propels Japanese university to Ig Nobel Prize

Researchers at Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences in Sagamihara, Kangawa Prefecture were last night awarded an Ig Nobel Prize in biology for displaying that bacterial extracts from panda poop can play a role in composting.

In a series of published papers, the university’s... Read More

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