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U.S. flu activity low, but Los Angeles confirms a women died

U.S. influenza activity remains low, but Los Angeles County confirmed its first death -- a woman with an underlying medical condition, an official says.

Dr. Jonathan E. Fielding, director of public health and health officer, says the woman resided in the San Fernando Valley and the particular... Read More

Dispersal Patterns Key to Invasive Species' Success

In 1859 an Australian farmer named Thomas Austin released 24 grey rabbits from Europe into the wild because it “could do little harm and might provide a touch of home, in addition to a spot of hunting.”

By the end of the century, the rabbits had begun to overrun native ecosystems, reaching ... Read More

Tel Aviv University team finds bacteria-killing protein, could replace antibiotics

A group of Israeli researchers has succeeded in isolating a protein that kills bacteria, in what is a first step toward developing a substitute for antibiotics. The substance isolated by a Tel Aviv University team prevents bacteria from dividing, thus destroying them and combatting infections. “... Read More

Ancient Virus DNA Gives Stem Cells the Power to Transform

A virus that invaded the genomes of humanity's ancestors millions of years ago now plays a critical role in the embryonic stem cells from which all cells in the human body derive, new research shows.

The discovery sheds light on the role viruses play in human evolution and could help scientis... Read More

Evolutionary Battle Explains Why Fruit Spoils

There’s a hidden war going on for your fruit. The apple snatchers and orange thieves aren’t what you might think, though. Humans and other fruit-loving species are locked in an ongoing evolutionary battle against the microbes that also want to feast. Now, researchers believe they have found out ... Read More

Bird Vaccine for West Nile Virus

University of British Columbia researchers have developed a vaccine that may halt the spread of West Nile Virus (WNV) among common and endangered bird species.

WNV, a mosquito borne pathogen, arrived in North America in 1999 and is now endemic across the continent. In 2012 alone, WNV killed 2... Read More

Heartland virus disease

Six new cases of Heartland virus disease have been identified in residents of Missouri and Tennessee. The cause of this disease appears to be a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family that was first identified in 2009 and appears to be transmitted by the Lone Star tick (Amblyo... Read More

Stopping Microbes Not Missiles: U.S. Plans For Next Global Threat

Spot the next plague before it arrives. Predict the next swine flu outbreak before it makes headlines. Even detect a biological weapon before it's launched.

These are the goals of an ambitious initiative, launched Thursday, to build a worldwide surveillance system for infectious diseases.

... Read More

FrameBot: a new tool for those pesky sequencing problems

In their paper in mBio this week, Wang et al present FrameBot, a program that combines frameshift correction and nearest-neighbor identification in one Java-based tool. Read More

HPV Vaccine Is Credited in Fall of Teenagers’ Infection Rate

The prevalence of dangerous strains of the human papillomavirus — the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States and a principal cause of cervical cancer — has dropped by half among teenage girls in recent years, a striking measure of success for a vaccine against the virus ... Read More

Seeing How Antibiotics Work

One would assume offhand that the pathways for synthesis and assembly of the major constituents of a bacterial cell “talk to each other,” i. e. they are tightly interwoven processes. Tampering with the biosynthesis of one should affect all the others, right? Wouldn’t you expect, for instance, th... Read More

Canine distemper in rare Amur tigers poses "significant risk to survival"

Endangered Amur tigers (also called Siberian tigers) face challenges from poaching, decimation of their prey base, and habitat fragmentation, but a disease from domestic dogs may be the straw that broke the tiger's back, according to the authors of a study in mBio this week. A team of scientists... Read More

Salmonella Jams Signals From Bacteria-Fighting Mast Cells

A protein in Salmonella inactivates mast cells -- critical players in the body’s fight against bacteria and other pathogens -- rendering them unable to protect against bacterial spread in the body, according to researchers at Duke Medicine and Duke-National University of Singapore (Duke-NUS).

... Read More

2014 ICAAC Awards Now Accepting Nominations

Help ASM honor deserving colleagues and young investigators by nominating for the Cubist-ICAAC and ICAAC Young Investigator Awards. The Cubist-ICAAC Award recognizes an outstanding scientist who is active in antimicrobial research, while the ICAAC Young Investigator Awards honor a superb young r... Read More

Increasing toxicity of algal blooms tied to nutrient enrichment and climate change

Nutrient enrichment and climate change are posing yet another concern of growing importance – an apparent increase in the toxicity of some algal blooms in freshwater lakes and estuaries around the world, which threatens aquatic organisms, ecosystem health and human drinking water safety.

As t... Read More

UC Davis researchers discover molecular target for the bacterial infection brucellosis

UC Davis scientists have uncovered a potential drug target for the development of an effective therapy against the debilitating, chronic form of the bacterial disease brucellosis, which primarily afflicts people in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern countries.

Brucellosis, which affects about 5... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 155 - Cells Save Superannuated Sequences

This episode: Bacteria are able to incorporate DNA from the environment into their genomes, even if it's thousands of years old!


(9.6 MB, 10.5 minutes)


Show notes: 
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Scientists re-define what’s healthy in newest analysis for Human Microbiome Project

University of Michigan microbiologist Pat Schloss, Ph.D., describes latest findings from Human Microbiome Project. Based on their findings in today’s Nature, there is no single healthy microbiome. Rather each person harbors a unique and varied collection of bacteria that’s the result of life his... Read More

Malaria: A race against resistance

Several African nations could strike a major blow against malaria by sacrificing the efficacy of some older drugs. Can they make it work?

It is September in southeastern Mali, and Louka Coulibaly is standing in the shade of a squat, concrete building, giving instructions to a dozen men and wo... Read More

colony picture of T. mentagrophytes.

This is colony pic of T. mantagrophytes grows on dermasel media after 10 days of incubation at 30'C. this study is done for our research work from superfical mycoses s suspected cases.specimens taken from trunk as skin scrapping suspected of T. corporis.microscopic pic of this colony shows penci... Read More

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