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Ebola Outbreak 2014 2015 by Dr. Fauci


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Life would go on if all bacteria disappeared

Microbes: They're everywhere, including inside our bodies. But are they really necessary? Not to life, scientists argue in a new paper — but certainly to life as we know it.

For starters, microbiologists Jack Gilbert and Josh Neufeld had to put aside the internal cell structures that were pro... Read More

Ebola in DRC: a new strain of the virus

While an Ebola epidemic has been raging in West Africa since March 2014, an outbreak of this haemorrhagic fever occurred in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in August, leaving fears over the virus' spread to Central Africa. A study by the IRD, the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS, the CIRMF... Read More

The Orange Queen

Rhodotorula species growing on Sabouraud's Dextrose Agar . Rhodotorula spp belonging to the family Sporidiobolaceae are pigmented Basidiomyceteous yeasts.They are ubiquitous.Previously considered non-pathogenic, Rhodotorula spp are now emerging pathogens known to cause infections in humans.Out o... Read More

Ebola Survivor: The Best Word For The Virus Is 'Aggression'

When Dr. Ian Crozier arrived in West Africa this past summer, he was stepping into the epicenter of the Ebola hot zone. The American doctor was working in the Ebola ward of a large, public hospital in Sierra Leone's dusty city of Kenema.

The trip nearly cost him his life. First came a fever, ... Read More

Of Planes, Microbes and Clocks

New research shows how disruption of human biological clock can have negative impact on human intestinal micobiome and in turn lead to metabolic dysfunctions such as weight gain and diabetes. Read More

Stars and Stripes #agarart2015

Stars and Stripes
BBL’s CHROMagar Staph Aureus agar is the canvas for this piece of agar art. Chromogens in the agar release a colored compound when hydrolyzed by specific enzymes allowing certain bacteria to appear different colors on it. The mauve stripes are Staphylococcus aureus, a bacteri... Read More

ASM GM 2015 - A Critical Role of the Plant Microbiome for Immunocompetency


Panelists discuss how much like the microbes in our gut, the plant microbiome also elicits a low-level immune response in the host plant. The researchers try to unravel the complexity of the plant microbiome to understand its functions and benefits to plant health.

{you... Read More

Developing global expertise in medical mycology and fungal immunology

As part of the Wellcome Trust Strategic Award for Medical Mycology and Fungal Immunology (WTSA MMFI), ten international students are awarded scholarships to complete a Masters of Research (MRes) at the University of Aberdeen, followed by a three-year PhD at any UK institution with expertise in t... Read More

"Bioleaching" bugs present viable mining method

Salt and acid-tolerant bacteria with the potential to be used in mining processing have been uncovered in the Wheatbelt.

The bugs were found during a "bio-prospecting" survey near Merredin and are likely to become more important in WA in coming decades as high-grade ore runs out.
CSIRO envir... Read More

Geometric Growth #agarart2015

Several species of bacteria and fungi were used to create this geometric pattern. Red colors are produced by the pigmented bacteria, Serratia marcescens. Occasionally, inanimate objects have been described as bleeding. The artist Raphael created the painting “The Mass of Bolsena,” where the b... Read More

Dragonfly #agarart2015

BBL’s CHROMagar Staph Aureus agar is the canvas for this piece of agar art. Chromogens in the agar release a colored compound when hydrolyzed by specific enzymes allowing certain bacteria to appear different colors on it. The mauve part of the dragonfly is Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium fre... Read More

A Billion Birthdays

If you think rabbits reproduce quickly, wait until you hear about microbes. A single bacterial cell can divide once every 20 minutes. Bacteria also do not grow in the same way as we think of growth; an individual growing larger. In bacteria, one full-grown adult cell divides to form two full-... Read More

Yersin the parrot

Micro art inspired by my parrot named Yersinia. Yersinia enterocolitica in an enteropathogenic bacteria, is gram negative bacili, non sporulated and flagellated; it causes diarrhea and gastroenteritis. My countrie is famous because the different species of birds and I like parrrots because th... Read More

colonies picture of candida spp.

Colonies of candida species:

Media: HiCrome Candida Differential Agar
principle: Perry and Miller (1) reported that Candida albicans produces an enzyme b -N-acetyl- galactosaminidase and according to
Rousselle et al (2) incorporation of chromogenic or fluorogenic hexosaminidase substrates ... Read More

Trial confirms Ebola vaccine candidate safe, equally immunogenic in Africa

Two experimental DNA vaccines to prevent Ebola virus and the closely related Marburg virus are safe, and generated a similar immune response in healthy Ugandan adults as reported in healthy US adults earlier this year. The findings are from the first trial of filovirus vaccines in Africa. Read More

A Magic night

Chromobacterium violaceum enchants the night and yellow Micrococcus sp. Gives us light so we can notice how Pseudomonas aeruginosa fills the mountains with a vivid green color. During that magic night a girl's red hair seems to dance at the rhythm of the wind while she appreciates the wonders of... Read More

Bifidobacteria micro-flower

Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis is a commercial probiotic widely used that can be found in many functional foods, mainly dairy products. In our research we are interested to know how this bacterium survives under stressing conditions once it is ingested with the food. Therefore, the capab... Read More

Giardia lamblia’s Trophozoite

Waving all over the small intestine, there can be a particular smiley face shaped parasite called Giardia lamblia. One can get the infection by eating cysts from contaminated food or water. This interesting parasite in its trophozoite state, absorbs their nutrients from the lumen of the small in... Read More

It's always 5 o'clock somewhere

The clock on this agar plate was drawn with a culture of Photobacterium leiognathi, a marine bacterium in the Vibrionaceae family. The design in this picture was illuminated with white light on the left, and photographed completely in the dark for the image on the right. This brightly luminous s... Read More

MMP #2: Ultrasmall bacteria with Birgit Luef and Chris Brown

Host: Jeff Fox Read More

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