Podcasts

Watch Latest Video Subscribe to Video Feed

ASM-Live-Banner

twiv_banner

twim_mwsite_badge

bacteriofilesbanner

isbadge

yellowstonelogo

Subscribe Learn More

mts_banner

This Week in Parasitism

a-radio

MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Microbes After Hours

shutdown

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Featured Image

Featured Video

Crowdsourced Microbes Heading to Station

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Getting Started with MicrobeWorld

More "How to" Videos:
| |
|

NTU scientists discover potential vaccine for malaria

Scientists from Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have discovered a key process during the invasion of the blood cell by the Malaria parasite, and more importantly, found a way to block this invasion.

With this new knowledge, NTU is looking to collaborate with the industry on... Read More

Salmonella Jams Signals from Bacteria-Fighting Mast Cells

A protein in Salmonella inactivates mast cells -- critical players in the body's fight against bacteria and other pathogens -- rendering them unable to protect against bacterial spread in the body, according to researchers at Duke Medicine and Duke-National University of Singapore (Duke-NUS).

... Read More

West African Ebola outbreak caused by new strain of virus: study

(Reuters) - An Ebola outbreak blamed for 135 deaths in West Africa in the past month was not imported from Central Africa but caused by a new strain of the virus, a study in a U.S. medical journal said, raising the specter of further regional epidemics. The spread of Ebola from a remote corne... Read More

Octopic cultivation

Cute octopus-like device for anaerobic cultivation of cellulolytic bacteria aimed to replace O2 with argon. Situated at the Faculty of Biology, Moscow State University, Russia. Read More

Leishmania parasites with greater infectivity associated with treatment failure

Visceral leishmaniasis, also called kala-azar, strikes 400,000 people every year and kills around 1 in 10 of its victims. The leishmania parasite, Leishmania donovani, has proven difficult to treat, in part because a large percentage of patients who take the drug of choice, miltefosine, relapse ... Read More

Hepatitis C Remains Major Problem for HIV Patients Despite Antiretroviral Therapy

A new study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that the risk of hepatitis C-associated serious liver disease persists in HIV patients otherwise benefitting from antiretroviral therapy (ART) to treat HIV.

It has been suggested that... Read More

HELPER CELLS APTLY NAMED IN BATTLE WITH INVADING PATHOGENS

By tracking the previously unknown movements of a set of specialized cells, Whitehead Institute scientists are shedding new light on how the immune system mounts a successful defense against hostile, ever-changing invaders.

Central to the immune response is the activity inside structures know... Read More

Versatility in Genetic Expression Aids Rapid Microbial Evolution

Microbiologists from Trinity College Dublin have discovered that an identical protein is used differently by two species of bacteria to help them cope with distinct types of environmental stress. The discovery reveals an extraordinary level of versatility in the way different genes are ‘switched... Read More

Growing bacteria keep time, know their place

Working with a synthetic gene circuit designed to coax bacteria to grow in a predictable ring pattern, Duke University scientists have revealed an underappreciated contributor to natural pattern formation: time.

In a series of experiments published Oct. 8, 2013, in the journal Molecular Syste... Read More

How an Aggressive Fungal Pathogen Causes Mold in Fruits and Vegetables

A research team led by a molecular plant pathologist at the University of California, Riverside has discovered the mechanism by which an aggressive fungal pathogen infects almost all fruits and vegetables.

The team discovered a novel “virulence mechanism” — the mechanism by which infection ta... Read More

Bacteria Use Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide to Produce Electricity

Researchers have engineered a strain of electricity-producing bacteria that can grow using hydrogen gas as its sole electron donor and carbon dioxide as its sole source of carbon. Researchers at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst report their findings at the 113th General Meeting of the A... Read More

Does medicine really need lab mice?

Using animals to test drugs destined for humans is controversial, with critics arguing there are other ways to ensure new medicines are safe and effective. But the scientists who carry out the research say animal studies remain necessary.

It is estimated that in the UK around three million mi... Read More

Assortment in colony biofilms

Effect of founder cell density on the spatial pattern formation in colony biofilms.
The colony biofilms were obtained by following the protocol described in van Gestel et al (2014) ISME Journal (doi: 10.1038/ismej.2014.52). Briefly, GFP and mKATE2 labeled Bacillus subtilis strain were mixed in ... Read More

Pithovirus: Bigger than Pandoravirus with a smaller genome

A new virus called Pithovirus sibericum has been isolated from 30,000 year old Siberian permafrost. It is the oldest DNA virus of eukaryotes ever isolated, showing that viruses can retain infectivity in nature for very long periods of time. Read More

Paramecium, showing contractile vacuole and ciliary motion (video)

Olympus BioScapes 2013 10th place Winner, Mr. Ralph Grimm. Paramecium, showing contractile vacuole and ciliary motion.

Click "source" to view. Read More

"Touchy" Bacteria Grow Tendrils Around Flaws

A common soil-dwelling microbe appears to have a sense of touch, researchers report.

A new study finds that Bacillus mycoides, a bacterium known to science since 1842, responds to forces and curvature in the medium on which it’s growing.

The microbe’s ability to respond to subtle changes i... Read More

Bacteria from lean mice prevent obesity in peers

But microbes are only part of the story — the effect also depends on a healthy diet. Gut bacteria from lean mice can invade the guts of obesity-prone cage-mates and help their new hosts to fight weight gain.

Researchers led by Jeffrey Gordon, a biologist at Washington University in St. Louis... Read More

Luminous bacterial proteins detect chemicals in water

"Pharmaceutical residues are becoming increasingly a problem for the environment. Sewage plants do not decompose these substances completely. The problem will worsen if one considers, for example, the rising proportion of elderly people in our society who actually account for the increased consu... Read More

Trial and error

Italian officials should not go ahead with expensive clinical tests of an unproven stem-cell therapy that has no good scientific basis.

The Italian government is planning to oversee a clinical trial of a controversial stem-cell therapy. There are many reasons for the trial to be stopped — and... Read More

Gut Reaction: Human Colon Replica Demonstrates How E. coli Contaminates Groundwater

Scientists are great at growing E. coli in the lab. They know exactly under which conditions various strains thrive. Unfortunately, there is only so much that can be learned from the bacteria’s behavior in an ideal, isolated and ultimately unrealistic environment. That is why a group of research... Read More

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600

Copyright © American Center for Microbiology 2012. All Rights Reserved.