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D- Zone Test for phenotypic detection of Inducible clindamycin Resistance

A positive D test indicates that the presence of macrolide-inducible resistance to clindamycin produced by an inducible methylase enzyme that alters the common ribosomal binding site for macrolides, clindamycin and the group B streptogrammins (quinupristin). This cross-resistance, called the ML... Read More

Vaccines work (in Spanish)

A pesar de los beneficios que suponen las vacunas, muchas personas desconocen cómo funcionan e incluso desconfían de su acción. Las vacunas siempre son más seguras que la propia enfermedad de la que protegen. Algunas enfermedades infecciosas no tienen un tratamiento efectivo y las vacunas son la... Read More

Bacteria and hand washing Pragmatic to school children in rural Nepal

Hand washing is thought to be effective for the prevention of transmission of
Diarrhea pathogens. However it is not conclusive that hand washing with soap is more
Effective at reducing contamination with bacteria associated with diarrhea than using water only. Read More

Kawasaki Disease Traced to Winds from Northeast China Carrying Unusual Fungal Load

In 2012 I wrote a story for Nature about a strange illness called Kawasaki Disease whose cause has eluded scientists for over 50 years. The diseases causes inflammation of the blood vessels in small children that leads to fever, rashes and reddening, and even coronary aneurysms that can cause he... Read More

Yellow Light Grows the Best Algae for Biofuels

Aaron Wheeler is the director of an interdisciplinary research group at the University of Toronto in Canada. The group develop lab-on-a-chip techniques for applications in biology, chemistry and medicine.

You recently reported an exciting technique that can screen algae grown under different ... Read More

Growth on Manital Salt Agar of Staphylococcus aureus and staphylococcus epidermis isolated from wounds

These clinical isolates are from Medinipur Medical College. Read More

Brazil releases 'good' mosquitoes to fight dengue fever

Brazilian researchers in Rio de Janeiro have released thousands of mosquitoes infected with bacteria that suppress dengue fever.

The hope is they will multiply, breed and become the majority of mosquitoes, thus reducing cases of the disease.

The initiative is part of a programme also takin... Read More

New device will find carcinogenic food fungus faster

One of the food industry’s major recurring challenges, detecting highly carcinogenic toxins that occur naturally in our most common crops, could soon be solved by groundbreaking research that exploits aflatoxins’ fluorescent properties.

Detecting Aflatoxins

Aflatoxins are present in a wide... Read More

MDR-TB: A Global Threat

In Pakistan prevalence and drug resistance of TB is on the rise. Late diagnosis and lack of resources are making the situation worse. In such a scenario molecular techniques such as PCR and hybridization would help in early diagnosis of TB and MDR TB leading to commencement of treatment at the r... Read More

On Teaching

A graduate student came to my office recently to say that she was increasingly bothered by anxiety and the ‘terror’ of having to speak at laboratory meetings. She had also learned a month ago that she was expected to lecture to a class organized by her mentor. The thought of having to lecture to... Read More

Terminal Proteins: Endless Possibilities

Although it is far from unanimous, the great majority of phages studied so far package their genomes for intercellular space travel as linear chromosomes. Why linear rather than circular? Packaging convenience, for one thing. Many phages, including all of the tailed phages, package their chromos... Read More

How brain guards itself against virus attacks

Infections in the central nervous system are rare thanks to our brain's unique defence system that prevents viruses from invading, finds a study. The research explains a long-standing mystery.

Click 'source' to read more. Read More

Researchers open door to new HIV therapy

BERKELEY — People infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) can stave off the symptoms of AIDS thanks to drug cocktails that mainly target three enzymes produced by the virus, but resistant strains pop up periodically that threaten to thwart these drug combos. Researchers at the Unive... Read More

The Oldest Gem Tells its Tale

Modern Earth is nothing like it was in its early days. Our planet was formed some 4.56 billion years ago when a giant stellar cloud collapsed on itself due its massive size and gravitational force. The explosion also generated the sun and many other planetary bodies, including those that would e... Read More

Powdery Mildew

Sawadaea sp. (Erysiphaceae, Erysiphales) is a powdery mildew that infects Acer sp. (Maple). Infected maple leaves, usually on the adaxial surface, are covered with dense mycelia (of white to grey powder colour) with scattered chasmothecia (fruiting body, brown to dark-brown ball-like structure).... Read More

Ebola outbreak “out of all proportion” and severity cannot be predicted

A mathematical model that replicates Ebola outbreaks can no longer be used to ascertain the eventual scale of the current epidemic, finds research conducted by the University of Warwick.

Dr Thomas House, of the University’s Warwick Mathematics Institute, developed a model that incorporated da... Read More

Tiny Algae Responsible for Mysterious Fossil Whale Graveyard?

Ever since a highway construction crew in Chile uncovered a fossil graveyard of some 40 prehistoric whales in 2010, with skeletons dating back more than five million years, scientists have wondered why so many giant animals died in one place. This week, a team of them proposed an answer: The hug... Read More

Worse Than The Bite

City dwellers across the U.S. might agree on one common enemy: bedbugs. But hey, not to worry, right? "Bedbugs are not known to spread diseases, but bites can be very itchy and irritating." Or so says the New York City Department of Health. But that assertion may not be true. Because a new study... Read More

Insight into pathogenic fungus

The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes yeast infections, diaper rashes and oral thrush, and is the most common fungal pathogen to infect humans. Researchers have identified a protein that the fungus uses to defend itself against the human body. Another concern with the fungus is that it can... Read More

Wolbachia, DNA Methylation, and Cytoplasmic Incompatibility

Wolbachia pipientis is a worldwide bacterial parasite of arthropods that infects germline cells and manipulates host reproduction to increase the ratio of infected females, the transmitting sex of the bacteria. The most common reproductive manipulation, cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), is expre... Read More

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